Farmers: Note the setback requirements for fertilizer application – The Globe

WORTHINGTON – Autumn is officially here. As many producers begin fieldwork and prepare for fall compost applications, now is the time to move past some of the setback requirements.

Here are some setbacks to follow while applying compost:

Protected lakes and wetlands

  • 0 to 25 feet: Compost is not allowed within 25 feet of a normal high water level.
  • 25 to 300 feet: Inject or enter within 24 hours and before it rains. Phosphorous administration to prevent long-term soil P buildup (see page 8: Soils high in phosphorous). Do not place manure on frozen or snow-covered soil in this area, even if there is a hedge. Do not use compost with irrigation equipment such as a center pivot or travel gun.
  • A temporary permit is required if manure is applied from feedlots containing more than 300 animal units along protected lakes and wetlands where average soil phosphorous levels exceed 75 parts per million (ppm) of Bray P1 (or 60 parts per million of Olsen). ) or where slopes exceed six percent. Exceptions to state requirements.
  • Immediate incorporation and management of phosphorous is recommended, but not required, if a permanent 50-foot-wide vegetative buffer (not planted with compost) is planted along the wetland or a 100-foot-wide vegetative buffer is planted along the lake.
  • It is allowed to use natural manure on seasonally saturated soils, the seeds of which are sown for annual agricultural crops or crop rotations for perennial herbs or legumes.

open tile sockets

  • Inject or combine the manure within 24 hours.
  • A temporary permit is required if manure from feedlots containing more than 300 animal units is applied within 300 feet of open tile intakes where average soil phosphorous levels exceed 75 parts per million of Bray P1 (or 60 parts per million). from Olsen) or where slopes exceed 6%.

water drainage channels

  • 0 to 25 feet: No manure allowed.
  • 25 to 300 feet: Inject or enter within 24 hours and before it rains. Phosphorous administration to prevent long-term soil P accumulation (see page 8: Soils high in phosphorous). Do not place manure on frozen or snow-covered soil in this area, even if there is a hedge. Do not use manure through watering equipment such as a center pivot or gooseneck.
  • A temporary permit is required if manure is applied from feedlots containing more than 300 animal units along drainage channels where average soil phosphorous levels exceed 75 ppm Bray P1 (or 60 ppm Olsen) or Where slopes exceed six percent.

Exceptions to state requirements

  • These practices are not required if the berm along the drain channel prevents runoff into the drainage channel. If waste water enters side inlets through the berm, practices are required.
  • Immediate incorporation and administration of phosphorous is recommended, but not required, if a permanent plant buffer (at least 50 feet wide and not planted with compost) is planted along the trench.

For more information on using manure on the ground, visit pca.state.mn.us/business-with-us/land-application-of-manure.
I hope everyone continues to have a safe and bountiful harvest in 2022.

Chris Prins He’s the Nobles County feedlot officer. He can be contacted at (507) 295-5322.

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