In this south London home, color-coded storage keeps the family organized

Definition of selective– elicit ideas from a variety of sources, according to the Oxford English Dictionary – might also say there is no definition. new book, eclectic life By Alexandre Breeze May 17 In his pages he proves that decor style is really in the eye of the beholder. One home is decked out in full English country charm with layers of floral prints and woven furnishings, while the other shows across the continent minimalistic until you reach the house’s woodworking room. A design-savvy couple, Jason and Jenny Rose MacLean, draw on the aesthetic with bold primary colors and a mix of furniture eras (see: yellow-patterned refrigerator and end-to-toe turquoise bathroom). Before that, in an excerpt, we delve into the MacLeans’ London home and how they use hanging storage and geometric prints to distract the eye.


In McLean’s Stanley’s son’s room, painted MDF cabinets include not only hidden storage, but neon baskets for toys tucked away at the end, as well as a spot for toys and favorite rocks collected on trips out of London.

Behind a neon orange door, tucked away on a side street in Camberwell, south London, the home of Jason and Jenny Rose McClain, the design duo is fond of bold blocking of color and strong pattern. “We visited Eames House in California and really wanted a home in London that had the same feel,” says Jason. “When we saw this, we knew it was for us.” Designed in the 1970s by architect Martin Crowley as his own home, the house was built on the site of what were then two garages.

In this south London home, color-coded storage keeps the family organized

Jason believes that “storage is very important”. “It’s always in that order – we really live that way. Everything we want to hide is hidden.” Storage units allow the remnants of life to be stuffed into drawers and cupboards, and the ceiling contains built-in hanging units original to the building.

When the street door closes behind you, you find yourself standing in a small cobblestone patio. The plants are partly housed in Willy Guhl’s concrete planters, and the glass facade of the office and bedroom space allows light to fill the rooms. “The house and its architecture completely dictated the décor and furniture we chose,” Jason says. The space had its distinctive sound – contrasting textures in the brick walls, painted metal of exposed structural trusses – prompting MacLeans to sympathetically furnish and decorate the rooms in keeping with that aesthetic: “But it all seemed so easy and natural, because of the kinds of things put together. And collect it. Everything sits nicely in the space, and over time we have added to our collection and the house has evolved.” They love the ’70s structure, and it shows. German modular storage in the office and living room and major furniture pieces, such as the String chair by Allan Gould, fit perfectly in the space and sit proudly against the colorful backdrops.

In this south London home, color-coded storage keeps the family organized

The pattern on the kitchen wall distracts from what would otherwise be an absolutely dominant part of the room – the wall-mounted oven – by Eley Kishimoto, the London-based fashion and design firm known for its print design.

The kitchen, a bright yellow space with hidden strip lighting and mirrored lights in the style of a Hollywood star, shows off the duo’s signature color. The pattern on the cabinets was designed by Eley Kishimoto, a longtime collaborator on several Studio MacLean projects. They are partially duplicated in the perforated metal grilles (leftovers from an old project) between the office and hallway; The light filtered through cleverly casts bright spots on the opposite blank wall.

In this south London home, color-coded storage keeps the family organized

At first glance, the MacLean family seems to shy away from wear and tear, preferring clean, clear aesthetic lines, but a closer look reveals places where they were allowed to show some distress; The leather of the sofa wears softly, and the bump and scratch proof on the desk in the office add nice wear to these rooms. There are even a few places where there are wall sockets in the breeze blocks.

The shelving system that divides the long living space in the kitchen is mostly for books, but the one shelving is for a small collection of old toolboxes. “We have plenty of loft storage space throughout the house, and it’s part of the original interior architecture,” explains Jason. ‘This allows us to circulate what we have, even though some things – like our French Brillié watch in the office – have always been in the same place. Other things, like models, old toys and pottery, come and go. Oftentimes, it’s nice to have You have to settle and offer some new items.” But what appears is carefully curated. In addition to color blocking, items are displayed in groups of similar pieces for greater impact. So is the case with the artwork in the living room, original test prints from the 1930s to the 1970s for Mac Fisheries supermarkets. “We actually have a huge collection of about 120 of them in stock. The rooms in our living room were designed by Hans Schleger. The colors are opaque and vibrant,” he adds.

In this south London home, color-coded storage keeps the family organized

In this south London home, color-coded storage keeps the family organized

The faded blue bathroom was completed in a hurry, as McClenns redecorated before a party that was to celebrate their wedding: “We were grouting and tiling the night before the party.” An en-suite “pod” in the corner of the master bedroom is a newer addition, and the swirling linear tiles are inspired by those found at German U-Bahn stations.

Shortly after photographing their home, the MacLean family sold the property and moved to the Gloucestershire countryside, into a dilapidated building – part of which is 300 years old. A little bit of contrast. How are they going to decorate it? Jason didn’t offer much: “It would be a bit similar, but it would be interpreted a little differently. Sometimes I wake up in the middle of the night thinking: What did we do?! But it’s a new challenge.”

In this south London home, color-coded storage keeps the family organized

Jason reveals, “Our home’s major bones have never changed.” “The floor we laid, the bathroom, the simple colours, the yellow look… But over time, life evolves, and so the house should too, but for us, this is basically changing the pictures on the walls or the display pieces rather than the decor.”
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Eclectic Life: Extremely Unique Interiors From Around The World ($45)

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