Top 10 Furniture Designs to Bring Japanese Aesthetics to Your Modern Home


I really feel that a well-made piece of furniture can add a touch of magic to even the simplest of living spaces! Simple, clean and always soothing and beautifully designed furniture helps the space radiate an aura of warmth and tranquility. They instantly make you feel at home. Today, a lot of designers are embracing the “Japandi” aesthetic when designing furniture. So, what is a Jabandi? It is a fusion of Japanese and Scandinavian words and marries Japanese and Scandinavian aesthetics. It’s the perfect blend of Japanese and Scandinavian design. These furniture designs are not only aesthetically pleasing but functional as well! Incorporate this collection of Japandi-inspired furniture designs into your home, to create a living space that will truly feel like a haven.

1. From outside to inside


Outside In is a multifunctional, shape-changing table that incorporates hand-carved grooves into its wood frame to resemble the tattered grooves of Japanese Zen gardens.

Why is it noteworthy?

Japanese zen gardens have provided constant inspiration for designers. While the sheer meditative quality of zen gardens is enough to look at some new ideas, the exquisite design of zen gardens makes their own creative vision for designers. Melbourne-based furniture, lighting and object design firm Sabu Studio found its own creative vision via Japanese zen gardens when designing the minimalist Outside In Table.

what we like

  • It features a sinuous wooden surface resembling grooves that have been hand-swept in a zen garden
  • Outside In is a crafty piece of furniture that looks totally at home in public hospitality spaces or even ballrooms

what we hate

2. Lor

Lur is a furniture collection that includes pot planters that also double as benches in the most organic way. Designed for Alki, a brand that always strives to collaborate with local businesses which makes it even more special as it combines premium knowledge and materials.

Why is it noteworthy?

To create the Lur Collection, designer Iratzoki Lizaso went to Goicoechea Pottery and worked with the local team. The headquarters of the pottery workshop is located in Ortzaize in Lower Navarre, a few kilometers from Alki. The Goicoechea family has been working with clay for three generations. The materials used, solid oak, and clay from the Goicoechea family quarry here are completely natural.

what we like

  • All products feature soft curves and organic shapes that have a warm aesthetic thanks to the choice of materials and CMF details
  • The collection is centered around the idea of ​​plant pots that can act as shelves and coffee tables

what we hate

3. Diag office



The Diag Desk is a modern minimalist desk designed to optimize office space while incorporating storage elements such as removable leather compartments. When it comes to offices, the simpler the better. Offices rooted in simplicity, either through a streamlined approach or by embracing Scandinavian aesthetics, offer plenty of practicality while keeping the design simple.

Why is it noteworthy?

Given its simple design, more desktop space can be allocated, as most office items are reserved. The Diag desk from Polish designer Marek Błażucki is one type of minimalist design that incorporates storage systems into its construction, ensuring that users have ample office space while keeping necessary stationery close at hand.

what we like

  • Incorporates extensive storage systems into its construction
  • Ensures that stationery does not fall off

what we hate

  • There are a lot of visually similar desks on the market

4. Temple



Shanghai-based firm Stellar Works teamed up with American design studio Bassam Fellows to come up with an East-meets-West-type chair that could fit in your dining room, office pantry, or independent coffee shop.

Why is it noteworthy?

Pagoda is inspired by the café culture of Shanghai during the 1920s and café chairs from Vienna in the 19th century. Apart from the fact that it is well designed, it is also convenient to assemble it as there are only six parts in the package.

what we like

  • Inspired by the cantilevered pagoda gates of Asia
  • You can choose from different finishes depending on the design of your home or work space

what we hate

5. The Plot Twist Bookshelf

PLOT TWIST bookshelves
bookshelf concept
Prolific German furniture designer Deniz Aktay recently introduced the Plot Twist Bookshelf. It is a piece of furniture that has four separate twisted wooden elements. They are connected to each other, form and create a stable shape.

Why is it noteworthy?

The bookshelf design allows it to be accessed from all sides. As with most Deniz Aktay product designs, this bookshelf is oddly satisfying. Curves are present as with other designer projects. In addition, most of Aktay’s work has undergone some bending or twisting, as with Wavelet, Tie Stool, and The Pet Table.

what we like

  • The shelves can accommodate books of similar sizes for a clutter-free look
  • The bookshelf is stable and stands on its own

what we hate

6. Eleven

Eleven office details
Eleventh Concept Office
Eleven is not just a number or that fictional character from a TV series. Eleven could soon be known as a private office designed to make working from home more enjoyable and productive.

Why is it noteworthy?

The Eleven Desk designed by Alberto Monteón could be a godsend. The industrial designer considered his experience and needs as a creative professional. The desk is perfect for those who have a lot of stuff and need some organization to help them finish tasks on time. The desk looks sturdy with the thickness of the table top and legs. It has enough spaces for everything you need to work.

what we like

  • The table top can accommodate a laptop, keyboard, monitor and mouse. In addition, there is enough space for your books, documents, pens and mug
  • There are hooks where you can hang your bag and headphones, plus another level for more stuff

what we hate

7. Acrobat



Acrobat is a multifunctional storage piece that combines the save components of a portlet table with the coat slit’s hold functionality.

Why is it noteworthy?

As we continue to shrink our living spaces, the more multifunctional our furniture, the better. Smaller spaces don’t necessarily have to mean less living space. Multifunctional furniture helps create more living space while doing a lot of household tasks. We usually have our own system for arranging EDC items such as key rings, wallets, and phones. Entryway tables and coat racks usually take the brunt of those organizational needs, so finding multiple functions in their design is key to keeping our homes tidy. Acrobat, a multifunctional coat rack designed by João Teixeira, combines storage components for an entryway table with those of a coat rack.

what we like

  • The metal tube tops can also be used to hang clothes or hats without the need for a hanger
  • The wooden structure connecting the beams provides a secure space for storing EDC items such as wallets, phones and key chains

what we hate

  • Can occupy a large space

8. InsTable

InsTable Construction
InsTable concept design
The InsTable is a side table that you can easily move and move around. It can be easily carried and moved to a different place because you can grab the furniture and go to it. However, it is really unstable as it only comes with two feet. He cannot stand alone because he needs to stand against a wall for support.

Why is it noteworthy?

This unique table may not always be reliable, but it can be the perfect conversation starter. It is sure to grab anyone’s attention with its unique look. Having only two legs does not require any permanent repair but this needs some form of physical support.

what we like

  • Serves as a place for items you want to have on hand

what we hate

  • It can be an unstable design

9. Cloth coffee table



Featuring a curved stand that serves as the table’s centerpiece, the fabric coffee table resonates throughout its construction. The book desk also finds a balance between boldness and elegance, offering a heavy centerpiece that helps ground the coffee table, without taking over the available table space. Featuring soft bold elements like a wavy table edge that mimics the look of a live edge, the fabric coffee table keeps the look dynamic without taking over the room.

Why is it noteworthy?

By doing the minimal before it’s cool, Japanese and Scandinavians share a lot of common design principles, including an emphasis on warmth, earthiness, and a subdued color scheme for an overall calming effect. With the goal of fusing these principles together for fabric design, Teixeira hoped to find “a balance between boldness and elegance, depending on the angle.”

what we like

  • A masterful blend of Japanese and Scandinavian design philosophies
  • The curved book platform is a distinct feature

what we hate

10. hidden


Hidden is a funky litter box that has been envisioned to be inconspicuous by design and fit into any modern home. The hardest part about owning a cat is taking care of the litter box. Cats often look after themselves and take care of them, but we are responsible for the litter. Litter boxes are not designed for cosmetic purposes, so cat owners usually have to find inconspicuous places to keep the litter box out of sight and out of mind.

Why is it noteworthy?

It’s never nice to have a litter box in the bathroom or even the basement, but our cats should go when you go. The designers with studio YUPD took it upon themselves to envision a litter box called Hidden that would be discreet by design, so it could be placed anywhere in the home.

what we like

  • discreet design
  • Inspired by interior design elements

what we hate

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